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Walton - Wakefield - West Yorkshire
Squire Charles Waterton the Naturalist
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Walton, Wakefield, West Yorkshire
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WALTON - A BRIEF HISTORY
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A BRIEF & INCOMPLETE CHRONOLOGY

"The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there."
Leslie Poles Hartley (30 Dec 1895 – 13 Dec 1972

• In the beginning....
The name "Walton" is fairly common in England, there are several villages and districts with the same name. One of the origins of the name is as a reference to a "village of the Welsh" or serfs. The Welsh being the native Britons living in what we now know as England. When the Romans left and the Romano-Britons had to fend for themselves, the Angles, Saxons and Jutes arrived from the area now known as Germany and the Netherlands to occupy large areas of the former Roman province. Some of these folk were already here, employed as mercenaries by the Romans. A settlement was already in existence when the Saxons arrived in the 7th century. The name has changed over the centuries from Weala-tun in Saxon days, through Waleton in the Domesday Book, Waton later in Norman times, settling on Walton in the Middle Ages.

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• Around 620 AD, Eadwine (or Edwin), a warlord of Norse descent invaded Deira (an area now roughly equivalent to West Yorkshire). Eadwine invaded the kingdom of Elmet (the name is still in use in places such as Sherburn-in-Elmet), and occupied the small settlement or village of Weala-tun (Walton). The Norsemen or Vikings played a significant part in the history of Yorkshire, and much of this heritage is to be seen at York.

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› More on place names: Many local place-names have interesting derivations: Haw Park Woods and Hare Park both owe their origin to the word "hay", which means a hunting ground or paled park. A "pale" is a pointed stake or fence post, it also described an enclosed area. Haw Park was part of the Walton Hall estate, but when Squire Charles Waterton built the wall around Walton Park (a.k.a. Waterton Park), Haw Park remained outside. The word "hay" appears on tombstones in St. Helen's Church, Sandal Magna, the parish church for Walton. However, the word ‘hay’, in this context, has long been corrupted to Haw and Hare. Bergh or Berg, as in the old quarry 'The Balk', is probably connected with the early Lords of Walton, the de Burghs. 

The de Burghs and Walton
Walton (together with Cawthorne) remained in the possession of the De Burghs for seven generations. It then passed with the coheiress of Sir John de Burgh to Sir William Ashenhull, whose heiress (Constance) conveyed it to John Waterton in 1435 when they married. Thus Charles Waterton's connection with Walton is long established.

The Berg Quarry (The Balk) was the source of the stone used to build Walton Hall and the wall. The old quarry is to the west of Overtown Grange Farm and shares a border with Woodfield Park.

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• In 1333, Thomas de Burgh received a licence to fortify his mansion at Walton, and to surround it with a stone wall built with mortar and to crenellate it. A crenel or crenelle is an indentation or gap in the parapet of a castle, wall or tower, from where the defenders could fire arrows or throw spears, etc., at unwelcome visitors. Thomas died shortly after receiving this licence, and before the work had proceeded very far.

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• Circa 1411: John de Waterton, Lord of the Manor of Corringham, married Katherine de Burgh, she was aunt to Constance Assenhull and the half-sister of Joan de Burgh. John and Katherine's son was Richard de Waterton.

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• 1435: Following the marriage of Constance Assenhull (the daughter of Sir Richard Assenhull and Joan de Burgh) to Richard de Waterton. A hall was built at Walton for the couple. This building was the forerunner of the present hall. It was a crenellated building of considerable size and boasted an oak panelled hall of around 27 metres (90 feet) in length. The Water Gate at Walton Hall is the only part of the original building still standing. It is the oldest building in the village. Constance brought with her the Walton and Cawthorne estates, which had come down from the de Burghs through her mother Joan. The Waterton's fortunes were much improved. As the Watertons were much in the habit of naming their sons Thomas, Robert and John, etc. through the generations, and because other branches of the family, e.g. the Methley Branch, used the same names, there has been much confusion as to exactly which Waterton did what.

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• 1540: Sir Robert Waterton is known to have owned the three hamlets of Middle Walton, Nether Walton and Upper Walton. 17th Century Overtown Grange Farm and Rose Farm were both built. These are the oldest surviving buildings in the village, apart from the remains of the Water Gate at Walton Hall. Priory Square -there must also have been a priory at Walton at some time, most likely during Medieval times. The house at the north west corner of Priory Square may have been part of the original malt kiln belonging to the priory. The Priory Estate was once owned by the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem.

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• The Civil War: In 1643 Parliament ordered lords and landowners to pay towards the expense of the Civil war. In 1644, Parliamentary troops enforcing this demand marched upon Walton Hall, then the home of Anne and Robert Waterton. While they waited, one soldier went to Walton village to fetch a keg of beer. When he returned, an occupant of the Hall fired a cannon ball from a small cannon or culverin at him and wounded him in the thigh. the culverin was later recovered from the lake by the Squire.

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• In 1722, Charles Waterton, the grandfather of Squire Charles Waterton, granted a lease for 199 years, at a pepper-corn rent, of two cottages in the village to be used as a school and dwelling for a schoolmaster, provided that two poor children from the village were taught free of charge. The other scholars would be taught at their parents' expense. These cottages were in Middle Walton, Shay Lane to the west of Walton House (now called Walton Manor Care Home). The houses were rebuilt in 1824 at the expense of the inhabitants of Walton.

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• In 1767, Thomas Waterton (father of the Squire), demolished the original Walton Hall and caused the present large Georgian mansion to be built in its place. Itt was built on an island in a lake of 30 acres. Under the porch is a life-sized otter with a pike in its mouth, the crest of the Watertons. On the front of the house is the Waterton coat of arms and an otter with a pike in its mouth. The original drawbridge approach to the house was replaced by an iron footbridge - still the only permanent link between the island and the shore. The park extends 260 acres and is surrounded by a high wall, up to 2.75 metres (about 9 ft) in height, much of which survives to this day - although largely ruined to the east of the Park. This extends the three miles round the Park and cost £10,000 - a huge sum for those days. There is one gate in the east, where a rough track headed towards Crofton, and two in the west - one for The Avenue over Walton Hall Canal Bridge, and a smaller gateway by Lock 15 at the Barnsley Canal summit.

In more recent times, sections of the wall have been partially demolished on the boundary of the golf club by the canal; the listed building status of Walton Hall has not managed to save the wall around the estate.

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• 1770s or thereabouts, Walton House, Shay Lane built for Elias Wright (it is thought). He was a local land agent and engineer. Later, the house was owned by Squire Charles Waterton for a time. The house is now called Walton Manor and is a private care home.

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• 3rd June 1782 - Charles Waterton (the Squire) is born at Walton Hall. Later to become a famous naturalist, taxidermist, a noted explorer and national, as well as local, celebrity.

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• 1790 Walton Lake was dredged, and the cannon ball from the 1644 siege was found and ‘preserved’ at the gateway. Later, the Squire marked the dents caused by cannon shot fired at the Water Gate's sturdy wooden doors. The doors are no longer present.

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• In 1790, Catherine Nevile, from Chevet, bequeathed £140 to be used for the establishment of a free school in Walton or neighbouring Chevet. In addition to providing the salary of the schoolmaster, four poor boys and four poor girls of Walton, and two poor boys and two poor girls of Chevet (to the west of Walton), were to be instructed in the English language. This endowment was bestowed upon the existing school.

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• 27th September 1793 Work started on the Barnsley Canal at Heath.

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• 8th June 1799 The Barnsley Canal was opened from Barnsley to the River Calder at Heath, passing by Walton Park (much later also known as Waterton Park), and through Walton at Soap House and Low Town. Later the canal was extended westwards from Barnsley to Barnby Basin. Thomas Waterton was a member of the canal committee. There were 12 locks on the Walton section, with a further three at Heath. The canal summit is just north of Walton Hall Bridge at Lock 15, the remains of which are still visible. Temporary accommodation was built at Stoneheaps Plantation for the canal navvies.

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• 1799 The Commons and Wastes Inclosures Act defined and recorded areas such as Walton Common, Walton Green, Greenside and Uppertown Green. Sandal Magna and Crigglestone also get a mention in this Act.

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• During the 19th Century five schools were in use

1. Between the War Memorial and the Methodist Chapel in Shay Lane, a building of two rooms was used. Billy Armitage taught the boys and his wife taught the girls. 

2. 1837 A school was carried on by Mr Atha in detached buildings on The Balk. The ground floor was a school and the upper room a Methodist Chapel. 

3. A school between Walton House (much later known as Walton Manor) and Walton Grange was kept by Tommy Lumb, a cripple who lived at Overtown Farm and came to school on a donkey cart. 

4. A school was kept by Jacky Sharpe where Walton Grange outbuildings are now. 

5. When the Midland Railway was being constructed, the Company had offices in buildings near Grove House in The Balk. These are also believed to have later housed a school. 

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• Six public houses or ale houses existed:

1. The New Inn, still there today. 

2. Cross Keys. This was marked on 1849-1851 Ordnance Survey Map at the corner of Shay Lane and Blind Lane (School Lane). Now replaced by houses. This was a near neighbour of Grove House. 

3. The Star, this was on School Lane on the site of the old Junior School. The school was built in 1910 and officially opened in 1911, and closed in 2007. The old school was subsequently demolished.

4. The Rose and Crown. This was 36 metres (about 40 yards) down Walton Station Lane (then known as Milnthorpe Lane). 

5. Boot and Shoe. This had a temporary licence during the construction of the railway. It was a half-timbered house, formerly known as Walton Old Hall, situated near the lodge house for Walton Grange. 

6. There was a beer house on Greenside which was frequented by canal navvies. The house fell into disrepute by the locals, however, and it became rowdy. 

In addition, there were a number of unlicensed premises, permitted by the Beerhouse Act, 1830, to sell beer. 

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• 19th century - the village population grew from 315 in 1801 to 745 in 1901. 

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• 1830 The age of steam - many railway lines were built. The first station was by Oakenshaw Lane, though Sandal and Walton station was soon built at Greenside. School Lane by the present post office was then called Station Road. The station was axed during the Beeching cuts of the 1960s. Back in the 19th century, many of the railway navvies lived in huts of sods on Shay Lane. 

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• 1830. Squire Waterton's son Edmund Waterton was born. His mother, Anne, died shortly afterwards and was buried at St. Helen's, Sandal Magna. Edmund later became a collector of antiquities. He was as different to his father as chalk is to cheese. His collection of historical rings is now in the Victoria & Albert Museum. He was fond of a fine life and later became bankrupt and cost the Watertons their home in Walton. 

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• 1830s. Grove House, The Balk built around this time, or perhaps even in the late 18th century. This is the building opposite St. Paul's Church.  Henry Clarkson, the railway surveyor (see 1835 below), had an office attached to farm buildings standing on the site of Grove House (7).

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• 1832. Soap works were established by Hodgson and Simpson in Soap House Yard. Pollution soon threatened the surrounding countryside. 

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• 1835. Railway Mania. The proposed route of the Leeds to Derby North Midland Railway through the Walton area is surveyed by Henry Clarkson, acting for the great engineer George Stephenson. Henry Clarkson describes his encounters with Sir William Pilkington and Charles Waterton in Railway Times in Memories of Merry Wakefield (7).
Pilkington's Chevet Viaduct, referred to by Clarkson, is at Haw Park Lane and carries the railway line that runs through Chevet Cutting and Walton. Mr. Clarkson also had offices in Walton, attached to farm buildings standing on the site of Grove House in The Balk (7).

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• 1840. North Midland Railway opened. This is the line that runs to the west of the village, crossing School Lane and then on to Oakenshaw Junction. It was later expanded to four tracks, but is now back down to one. It is now used as a freight line for Monckton Coke and Chemical Works and for testing trains, e.g. the (then) new Virgin Cross Country trains around 2003, as well as the ancient diesel passenger trains in use in this part of the world. 

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• 1846. Charles Waterton and Sir William Pilkington both complained of fumes from the salt-cake furnace at the soap works affecting their estates (Walton and Chevet respectively). Also Lumb and Matthewman (local farmers) complained that local drinking water was unfit for cattle due to polluted drains across their lands. Many trees died in Walton Park. 

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• 1846-9. After a series of inconclusive court cases, it was decided to move the premises of the soap works to Thornes, Wakefield. This was land owned by the Watertons. The soap works continued to pollute, but also provide employment in Wakefield for many years. 

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• 1850. The buildings in Soap House Yard were sold. Now this area is a residential courtyard. 

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• 1856. The Methodist Chapel in Shay Lane was built, with considerable encouragement from Mr Simpson of Soap House fame. 

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• In 1857, Miss Mary Pilkington of Chevet Hall opened a new National School on the site of the now demolished Junior School in School Lane. 

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• 1862. For a while, the Shay Lane school by Walton House (now known as Walton Manor) was occupied by the schoolmaster, paying 6d (six 'old' pence, equivalent to 2.5 'new' pence) per annum to Charles Waterton (the Squire), the owner. However, the building became a ruin and it was abandoned. There being no trustees to claim an interest in the old school, Squire Waterton demolished the building and reclaimed the site.

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• 26th May 1865. 'Squire' Charles Waterton fell over a log of wood in Stubbs Piece or Wood at the head of the Walton Hall Lake, resulting in him sustaining fractured ribs and an injured liver. He died the following day. His body was interred on 3rd June, his birthday, near the spot where the mishap occurred. A stone cross marks the place where he fell. The area is now overgrown and neglected, but peaceful. 

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• 1870’s. Three local coal companies were seeking to mine coal: Walton Coal Company, Chevet Company and Hare Park Coal Company. These were not successful and went into liquidation towards 1880, never having worked coal. 

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• In 1871, Miss Mary Pilkington founded her Training, Laundry and Cooking School, "to prepare girls for service", across the road from the National School (see 1857 above). The building was constructed in 1867. It is now two semi-detatched cottages, known as Manor House and Bridge House. Following the establishment of the National School, the earlier schools declined and closed. Mary Pilkington was a relative of Catherine Nevile. Chevet Hall was later owned by Wakefield Council, who demolished it. 

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• 1871 - 1891. Walton Hall was leased for 21 years to Edward Hailstone. He remained there until he died in 1891, resisting the effort of the Simpsons to dislodge him (see below).

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• 1876. Walton Hall and Park were sold by the financially embarrassed Edmund Waterton to 'Soapy' Edward Simpson for £114,000. Thus Walton Hall fell into the hands of the Squire's enemies, the Simpsons. The Watertons' long connection with the Walton Hall was thus severed. Edward Simpson also owned several cottages and four principal residences at that time: Walton Hall, Walton House (now Walton Manor), Grove House, Thornhill House (now demolished), and the site of a fifth, Walton Grange. The price of Walton Hall had been inflated because it was thought that workable deposits of coal could be extracted from Walton Park. Having failed to destroy the Park with their soap works, the Simpsons would now seem to be wanting to dig it up in the search for coal. This, fortunately, did not happen. 

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• 1880. A murder was committed in the village. Tom and Hannah Beckett lived in a two-roomed house in Soap House Yard. On his return from work as a farm hand Tom found his wife about to go out with her lover, Harry Ogden from Newmillerdam. After an argument he cut her throat with a razor and then his own. They were found later by the lodger, Mr Marshall. Tom Beckett later recovered in Clayton Hospital to eventually face the consequences of his violent crime, but his wife had paid a high price for being unfaithful and was reported dead at the scene. 

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• 1892. A water supply was laid to the village, and the wells fell into disuse. 

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• 1896. The Methodist Chapel was enlarged. 

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• 1898. St. Paul's was dedicated by the Bishop of Wakefield. It owes its existence to the generosity of Mr Edward Simpson, who provided the land and materials for the construction of the church.

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• 1903. Plans were put forward to close Miss Pilkington’s laundry.

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• 1906. A decision was made to build a new school; it was the now demolished junior school in School Lane. 

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• 1910. Methodist Sunday School opened. 

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• 1911. New school in School Lane opened (since closed and sold - 2007). 

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• 1923. The railway became part of the London Midland Scottish Railway (LMS). Chevet Tunnel was transformed into a cutting between 1923 and 1925. The spoil heap is still there by Walton Common.

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• 1940. Walton Hall started to be used as a Maternity Hospital. 

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• 7th Decemner 1950. Barnsley Canal - the last boat passed Royston Bridge (south of Walton). 

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• 1950's Thornhill Estate built (Thornhill House having been demolished). 

• 10th June 1952. Barnsley Canal - the last boat used Heath Lock. 

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• 1953. Final abandonment warrant for the Barnsley Canal issued. 

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• 1954. Bus shelters installed around the village. 

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• 1956. Soap House Bridge (High Town Bridge) over the Barnsley Canal was demolished. It was something of an accident black spot. 

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• 22nd April 1959. Walton Colliery Disaster - this cost the lives of 5 men and injured another. A plaque at the Millennium Gate, School Lane, commemorates this tragedy. 

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• 1964. Miners Welfare Club officially opened (now the Walton Sports and Social Club). 

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• 1966. Church Hall in School Lane was bought for use as a Village Hall. The Library Committee later bought the Village Institute. 

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• 1967. St Paul’s Church completed at a cost of £12,000. It replaced a ‘tin’ structure on The Balk which had been used for the previous 60 years. Work on extending the church by the construction of the Barnabas Rooms took place in 2001. 

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• 1969 A plan was put forward by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds to use Walton Hall for a Natural History Museum. It was also hoped to lease part of the canal for conservation in a nature trail for children in conjunction with the project. 

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• 1974. Applications by a developer (Walton Park Development Company) to convert the Hall, Park and Lake into a Leisure Centre and Outdoor Pursuits Centre. This was rejected because it was thought that Walton residents would not benefit from a club which would be exclusive and expensive to join. Walton Action Group pointed out that the additional weight of traffic on inadequate roads would harm trees and wildlife, destroy farmland and lead to devalued property. A familiar sounding argument to that put forward when development of houses on Grove House Farm and a golf course was proposed in the 1990s. 

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• 1977. Walton Infant School, The Grove, opened.

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• 1980. Walton Colliery (formerly Sharlston West) closed. Later transformed into Walton Colliery Nature Park. 

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• 1986 - 1989. Lakeland Way and High Meadows developments built. Then a field, the Lakeland Way area had been used by West Yorkshire Police for training their horses. 

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• 1990s. Grove House Farm, houses built. It had been a working farm until this time. Waterton Park Golf Club (WPGC) opened in Walton Park, with club house on the former Avenue by the Barnsley Canal. There is still public access to much of Walton Park (now also known as Waterton Park). 

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• 1999. Walton Locks houses built on site of Barnsley Canal near the site of Soap House Bridge (High Town Bridge), between the New Inn and Walton Sports and Social Club.

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• 2000. Two houses built on land formerly belonging to Grove House, The Balk. The medical centre adjacent to the village hall in School Lane is closed, and a private residence is built on the site. The Millennium Clock is added to the village hall. The Millennium Gate is officially opened on 24th June 2000. 

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• 2001. St Paul's Church, The Balk extended by the addition of the Barnabas Rooms.

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• 2001 Census data for Walton CP and a few nearby civil parishes.

 
All people


Persons
Count
Apr01
All males


Persons
Count
Apr01
All females


Persons
Count
Apr01
All households


Households
Count
Apr01
Walton CP
Parish
3,377 1,602 1,775 1,374
Chevet CP
Parish
66 33 33 26
Crofton CP
Parish
5,978 2,974 3,004 2,336
Havercroft with Cold Hiendley CP
Parish
2,103 1,037 1,066 788
Hessle and Hill Top CP
Parish
97 53 44 41
Huntwick with Foulby and Nostell CP
Parish
90 45 45 46
Wintersett CP
Parish
50 26 24 19
Last Updated: 28 April 2004
Source: Office for National Statistics

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• 2003. Change of landlord in the New Inn, Tommy takes over and the pub turns Turtle! The next change of landlord was to be in 2011.
This year's gala was to be the last until 2010.

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• 2007. The new primary school is opened in The Grove, combining the infants and junior schools. The old junior school was sold at auction for £625,000, demolished and planning permission sought or dwellings to be built. The village library is relocated to the new junior school and the former library building is sold at auction in Leeds, achieving a hammer price of £194,000.

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• 2009. Planning permission for redevelopment for the old school site was refused and the developer lodged an appeal with the Secretary of State against the decision.
Elsewhere in the village, another development scheme was proposed – this time for a ‘continuing care’ retirement community on the former farmland of Grove House Farm at the end of The Grove.

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• 2010. The saga of Grove House Farm (land off the Grove) continued and did not reach a conclusion in 2010, despite being refused by Wakefield Metropolitan District Council on 3rd September 2010.
Walton Gala recommenced after a gap since 2003.

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• 2011. Grove House Farm (land off the Grove). In September 2011 a revised application was made, similar to the first development but with just 129 units (Ref: 11/01749/OUT). An alternative proposal was also submitted for the establishment of a tempoary gypsy and traveller camp on the same parcel of land. Several well-attended public meetings were held and support for the retirement community was evident. The retirement community application was heard in committee on 24th November and again on 15th December where it was unanimously APPROVED by the committee.
The issuing of a decision notice is subject to acceptance by WMDC of a Unilateral Undertaking (Sec 106 agreement) outlining the obligations to be fulfilled by the applicant.

• In December 2012, the New Inn changed hands again and the pub was refurbished.

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• 2013

HS2
Government announces HS2 High Speed Train Route, Walton is affected. Visit Gov.uk to see the HS2 phase two initial preferred route plan and profile maps. (Published 28 January 2013).

Walton Library
After being closed by Wakefield Metropolitan District Council, the village library re-opened as a community-run operation in April. Visit web site.

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• 2015
Walton Neighbourhood Plan. WALTON NEIGHBOURHOOD PLAN REFERENDUM
The plan went to a referendum on 3rd December 2015, and 96% of voters said "YES" making the Walton Neighbourhood Plan the first in Wakefield, and first in Yorkshire."

"The Walton Neighbourhood Plan area comprises the village of Walton, Wakefield, West Yorkshire and its surrounding countryside.

Walton is proud of its heritage and through the neighbourhood plan we hope to shape any future plans for our village and have a real say on what happens on our doorstep."

"It was a resounding 'YES' vote!!!

Our Plan is the first Neighbourhood Plan in Yorkshire to be adopted and gives confirmation that residents in Walton really care about the future of our village.

The stats: 890 people voted 2 ballot papers were spoiled 39 people voted No 849 people voted Yes! A 34.11% turnout which is better than most local elections*."

The above are extracts from Walton Neighbourhood Plan website. (Accessed 13 Dec 2015)

(* Compare the Walton referendum turnout with some local elections held on 5th May 2016
. West Yorkshire’s Police and Crime Commissioner Election.
The total West Yorkshire turnout was 34.77%.
Source: http://www.wakefield.gov.uk/Pages/News/PR8218.aspx. Accessed 10th May 2016.

. Wakefield Metropolitan District Council Election.
The overall turnout was 30.23%.).
Source: http://www.wakefield.gov.uk/Pages/News/PR8217.aspx. Accessed 10th May 2016.)

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Wakefield Metropolitan District Council's response to the referendum.
Extract from The Citizen, Issue No. 60, Annual Edition, March 2016.

"People in Walton voted in favour of a neighbourhood plan, which will now be used as guidance for future planning decisions. It was the first neighbourhood plan in the Leeds City Region to go to a public vote.

The plan was prepared by Walton Parish Council as a result of the Localism Act.
It encourages local communities to get more involved in issues which affect their neighbourhoods. When adopted by the Council it will form part of the Development Plan."

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• 2016

Walton Open Gardens.Sunday 3rd July.
The inaugural Open Gardens event was held in the village.

"The day was a great success, with people flooding the village right from the 11 am start until the 4pm finish. There were stalls at most gardens selling various new and second hand items, a bustling café running in the village hall, raffles, tombolas and an ice cream van, taking full advantage of the glorious sunny weather."

Most gardens saw visitor numbers almost reaching 500, and the sum raised for the Community Library was in excess of £5,000. The support of a number of different groups, and many local people made the event possible. (Extract, adapted, from the Walton Library Newsletter July 2016).
Visit web site.




The Cost of Living in Walton

COUNCIL TAX & THE PARISH PRECEPT 
COUNCIL TAX
The valuation band for a house is based upon "the price at which it might reasonably have been sold on the open market on 01/04/1991". Band D is used as a "marker" or baseline reference point. (Range of Values £68,001 - £88,000, Band D Proportion 9/9) 

Year 1995 -1996
In 1995 -1996 the Band D tax was £548.67 (excluding parish precept). 

Year 2000 -2001
Band D £783.36. The council tax less parish council precept for a Band E Valuation Property (valuation range £88,001 £120,000, Band D proportion 11/9) was £980.61 for the year 01/04/2000 to 31/03/2001, with Band A (lowest at up to £40,000, Band D proportion 6/9) being £522.24, and Band H (highest, over £320,000, Band D proportion 18/9 ) at £1,566.72 (excluding parish precept). 

Year 2001 - 2002, Band D had increased to £819.46. In 1995/1996 the Band D tax was £548.67 (excluding parish precept). Year 2003 - 2004, Band D increased to £990.50 (excluding parish precept). Band E increased to £1,236.07 (including parish precept of £25.46). 

THE PARISH PRECEPT
Year 1995 - 1996
: £21,000 (the Band D tax contribution being £18.87)
Year 1999 - 2000: £21,000
Year 2000 - 2001: £22,000 (the Band D tax contribution being £18.95)
Year 2001 - 2002: £22,000 (the Band D tax contribution being £18.88)
Year 2002 - 2003: £23,000
Year 2003 - 2004: £24,000 (the Band D tax contribution being £20.83) 


GRAPEVINE
Percy, Neville, Waterton and more .....

OUR CHURCH HERITAGE
Those aficionados of Sunday night television may well have been enjoying The White Queen on BBC1. The series highly features the Neville family; the Duchess Cecily mother of Edward lV, her nephew Earl of Warwick “The Kingmaker”, and his daughters Isabel and Anne who married Edward’s brothers. The Neville family have two connections with our Parish. Duchess Cecily lost her husband, Richard Duke of York, her son Edmond Earl of Rutland, and her brother Richard Neville Earl of Salisbury (father of Warwick) at the Battle of Wakefield in 1460.
The second connection is that a distant branch of the Neville family lived in our Parish, at Chevet Hall before the Pilkingtons. Sir John Neville inherited Chevet though his marriage to Elizabeth Bosville in 1509. He was 7th cousin once removed from Edward IV both being descended from Sir Geoffrey de Neville who lived at Raby Castle in the early 13th century.
(1)

Further to the article in last July's issue of grapevine (above) which showed how the Nevilles in the TV programme the White Queen where distantly connected to our Church. Well we have another connection to the Neville family, In the corner where the choir sings and band plays there is a remnant of the old pews that used to be in our Church. On a closer look you will notice a coat or arms. This belongs to Josceline Percy 1480-1532, son of the 4th Earl of Northumberland who married Margaret Frost of Featherstone. Josceline's great grandmother was Eleanor Neville (1397-1472) sister of Cecily Neville, Duchess of York. This makes him first cousin twice removed of Edward IV and Richard III and so a distant cousin of the Nevilles of Chevet Hall.
Josceline's son Edward married Elizabeth Waterton of Walton Hall and their son Thomas was a leader in the Gunpowder Plot. He died following an altercation with Crown forces in November 1605. There are members of the Percy family living in New Zealand who claim legitimate decent from Thomas and so claim they are the true Earls of Northumberland.
(2)

Charles Elliott
From grapevine, the newsletter of the Ecclesiastical Parish of Sandal Magna,
St. Helen's, Sandal, and St. Paul's, Walton.
1. July/August 2013.
2. March 2014.

 

~~~

Sources include:
1. John Goodchild Loan Collection;
2. Walton Chronology by Margaret Vernon (1978);
3. Wanderings in South America, by Charles Waterton, edited by the Rev. JG Wood (1880);
4. A History of Walton by Peter Wright (1985);
5. Walton and its History
A selection of documents, maps and illustrations from the Wakefield Library Collection and the John Goodchild Loan Collection, Wakefield District Library, 1985. (More about local history resources on the official web Wakefield site Wakefield Metropolitan District Council).
6. Wakefield Express, the weekly newspaper for Wakefield and district.
7. Memories of Merry Wakefield by Henry Clarkson, 2nd. edition, 1889.
8. General: Local residents and J.S. Sargent (document author);
Council Tax Information Booklets, City of Wakefield Metropolitan District Council. 



Books about Walton, Charles Waterton, Guyana, and more!
See a selection of
books about Walton,
Charles Waterton,
Guyana and more.
• click here •
(Offered for sale by
Amazon.co.uk)




The HOW Project

A History of Walton, Peter Wright
A History of Walton,
Peter Wright


A Pictorial History of Walton, Alan Bowers
A Pictorial History of Walton, Wakefield.
Alan Bowers


Click to enlarge
The Walton Millennium CD.
If you can track down a copy, it contains photographs and other titbits relating to the village.


Walton in 1971
Walton in 1971
YouTube video
WALTON - A BRIEF HISTORY
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